“The Moroccans” of Leila Alaoui at the YSL Museum Marrakech

Les marocains©Leila Alaoui/courtesy Fondation Leila Alaoui

Les marocains©Leila Alaoui/courtesy Fondation Leila Alaoui

Les marocains©Leila Alaoui/courtesy Fondation Leila Alaoui

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Les marocains©Leila Alaoui/courtesy Fondation Leila Alaoui
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Les marocains©Leila Alaoui/courtesy Fondation Leila Alaoui
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Les marocains©Leila Alaoui/courtesy Fondation Leila Alaoui
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#MARRAKECH We discovered Leila Alaoui’s very beautiful work at the Abbey of Jumiège in 2016, on a proposal from Jean-Luc Monterrosso, alongside the videos of Moussa Sarr or the portraits of Valerie Belin. The young woman had just disappeared a few weeks earlier, victim of indiscriminate terrorism during the attack in Ugadougou on 15 January 2016. It was with great painful dignity that her mother, Christine, presented, on behalf of her daughter, the series “The Morrocans”. Three years later, the Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech Museum pays tribute to the young photographer and the emotion, when we find the sublime and colourful large formats is intact, and for the first time since its opening, the Museum has chosen to offer free access to allow everyone to discover the work of the young woman, who has grown and is now resting in the city.

The exhibition, orchestrated by Guillaume de Sardes, features some thirty portraits, some of which were still unpublished, which aim to reflect the ethnic and cultural diversity in Morocco. In direct contact with those she met during a road trip between 2010 and 2014, she creates the portraits with her mobile studio that she installs with a feeling. The scenography retraces the path taken by the young woman, a physical and spiritual journey to discover her roots, the memory of a beloved country. The faces gathered here are often serious and chiselled, but what always strikes us as much as ever is the vitality, the energy that springs from the eyes. Leila Alaoui’s photographic bias is objective. The relationship is frontal, both for the person who takes the photograph and for the model who takes the pose. The strength of the approach lies in the capture of these expressions that still accompany us long after we have left the Majorelle garden district.

 

The Moroccans, Leila Alaoui

Until February 5, 2019

Yves Saint Laurent Museum Marrakech

Rue Yves Saint Laurent40090
Marrakech, Morocco10am
to 6pm except on Wednesday last
admission at 5:30pm

 

 

 

Lili Tisseyre

Journalist then production director, Lili Tisseyre directed the creation and editorial management of the first web content for the Endemol group’s Real Tv show in the early 2000s. Holder of a...

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