A drawing… a line! Meeting with Christelle Tea

Bains Geliert©Christelle Tea

L’Opéra Garnier, Paris 9e ©Christelle Téa

Hangar Taxidermie de la collection d’Anatomie comparée du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle de Paris ©Christelle Téa

Bloc opératoire siamoises, 15.V.2018, II, Hôpital Necker enfants malades, Paris ©Christelle Téa

Conférence d'Hervé di Rosa invité par François Boirond aux beaux-Arts©Christelle Tea

Trulli
Bains Geliert©Christelle Tea
Trulli
L’Opéra Garnier, Paris 9e ©Christelle Téa
Trulli
Hangar Taxidermie de la collection d’Anatomie comparée du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle de Paris ©Christelle Téa
Trulli
Bloc opératoire siamoises, 15.V.2018, II, Hôpital Necker enfants malades, Paris ©Christelle Téa
Trulli
Conférence d'Hervé di Rosa invité par François Boirond aux beaux-Arts©Christelle Tea

Life in every detail. Because they are the ones who shape the place, give an atmosphere to the environments, make everything unique. Draw them to make them live, make them live. Christelle Tea‘s drawings are full of details. His pupils detect everything, see what you can’t see anymore. His gaze perceives beyond a reality that is often too bland.

Born in 1988, Christelle Tea has a double background: Fine Arts and lyrical singing. Drawing and photography are these two preferred mediums, especially photomontage, which she has set aside a little to devote herself to the drawn solicitations to which she is subjected. Participant in numerous group exhibitions, winner of the Prix Spécial Coup de cœur de l’Art est vivant, the DDESSIN exhibition in 2016, and a special mention from the jury at the David Weill Award in 2017, this insatiable chronicler paints a portrait of places as different as a museum, an operating theatre, a luxury hotel, urban architecture or portraits of personalities from the art world, accompanied in particular by the importance of drawing in their homes to reveal their personality.

Each drawing starts with a detail and then builds like a ivy that invades the page. Without preparation or correction, the final result invades our eyes and plunges us into an intoxicating universe, a meticulous and striking image.

 

Marlène Pegliasco: Why drawing?
Christelle Tea: I’ve been drawing since I was a little girl. It started when I was 6 years old when I had to spend my evenings in the family restaurant, a Chinese restaurant where I went with my sister after school and where I spent my evenings. One day, not knowing what to do, my mother passed me her order book and I started drawing. I continued along this path until I did a graphic design BTS at the Olivier de Serres school then at the École des Beaux-Arts and in parallel the conservatory under the direction of Alexandra Papadjiakou. Studying in these two areas is very rewarding.

Marlène Pegliasco: The drawing took over everything else. ?
Christelle Tea: While I was finishing my studies at the Beaux-Arts, I was contacted to participate in the DDessin exhibition. I also had to choose between singing and drawing. To be an artist is to be a creator. We have the opportunity to do what we love but we live from day to day. Finally, I like to participate in competitions and be judged by external juries.

Marlène Pegliasco: What is your way of working?
Christelle Tea: I draw in situ, without preparatory drawings and without repentance. I settle down with my drawing board, my chair, I pick up a point of view and then I start. Then, the drawing develops, details after details, without construction lines. I always have the surprise of the result at the end. That’s why I use ink because I can’t correct anything. The paper has a grape format, 50 x 65 cm, I can spend 10 hours drawing, I don’t see the time spent. For the portraits drawn in their environment, I start with the faces, eyes and hair, to free the person, the face, the body and then the person is free and I stay the day to make the environment or when the model has the time it remains. In my portraits, I don’t try to be fair, that is, not a photographic resemblance but of what I see of the person. I apply my ingenious, candid, non-judgmental gaze to it. For conferences, I start with the bubbles first, then I wait for the moment when people stabilize to draw them. It is important to draw reality, those things that we no longer see out of habit and yet it is difficult to capture our attention. It is these banalities that contribute to the beauty of the world. Drawing makes me feel like I’m in a bubble. This medium has allowed me to express myself, I say what others do with words, it is a breath, a breath, a freedom of expression. Art is magic.

Marlène Pegliasco: There are very few colour drawings, your production is mainly in black and white.
Christelle Tea: I use colour when it’s obvious. For the Budapest Baths, I was interested in working on the water, moreover, it is a very mythical place where you can combine so many professional meetings, tourist visits or romantic outings. These blue colors sky, navy, shades, all this was necessary.

Marlène Pegliasco: What is your news?
Christelle Tea: Currently, I draw drawings in the taxidermy sheds of the Museum of Natural History in Paris. Then I will exhibit from February 07, 2019 at Galerie Chaptal in the 9th arrondissement where some thirty architectural or interior drawings characteristic of this arrondissement will be presented. Finally, I will participate in Drawing Now with Galerie Jean de Brolly.

 

Portrait of a draftswoman
If you were a drawing? Dürer’s Great Grass Tussock (1503
)Your favourite technique? Chinese inkThe
most unusual medium?

The paper
“Drawing is like…”?

Breathing in

Marlène Pegliasco

Graduate of a Master in Art History and living in Toulon, I created the blog Art In Var (www.artinvar.fr) to share with my readers, the rich artistic news of this beautiful department. This passion...

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