William Kentridge ” A poem that is not our own “

Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »

Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »

Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »

Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »

Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »

Trulli
Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »
Trulli
Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »
Trulli
Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »
Trulli
Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »
Trulli
Vue de l'exposition William Kentridge, « A poem that is not our own »

#BASEL“I practice a political art, that is, an ambiguous, contradictory, unfinished, purposeful art: an art of measured optimism, which rejects nihilism. » said William Kentridge. The South African artist who always fought apartheid and colonialism superbly paved the way for what can now be a political art. Often dominates a victimitarian and Manichean discourse that excludes any form of nuance or criticism, which under the guise of being the voice of a particular ethnic or sexual group, imposes what has always threatened art to get rid of its cursed part: morality and puritanism. To these, William Kentridge responds with poetry, in its broadest expression, by seizing the seeds of all intolerances, misunderstandings and cleavages and making them blossom through drawing, animated and homemade film, theatre and dance.

A devotee of a total art, he explores politics by submitting it to the roots of evil, to its hidden depth, to our rituals and, above all, to the history of this Africa which is written only by the colonizer. The artist plays with brilliance all the rhythms and figures, sometimes cut into Chinese shadows, shake at the bottom of the night like spots of light. The moving images march in the processional slowness of a ceremony. The present and the past interfere in the drawing drawn with virulent strokes then erased, redone on its traces, photographed, then taken again on a newspaper or on cardboard. It’s dirty and alive. The thickness of the charcoal drawing unfolds like frescoes. His cuts, alternately soft, violent or giggling, illustrate nothing, they are only the grotesque figurines of an incantatory rhythm that aims at a form of catharsis to exorcise the demons of history, to make the echo of exile and migration. Between appearance and erasure, everything is at stake here as a metaphor for our relationship to the world.

Born in 1955 in Johannesburg, William Kentridge was noticed at the Documenta in Kassel in 1997. It was exhibited at the Jeu de Paume Museum in 2010 and at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid in 2018.

 

Until October 13, 2019

William Kentridge, “A poem that is not our own”

Kunstmuseum Basel

Michel Gathier

With a literary background, Michel Gathier developed a passion for art very early, particularly during long stays abroad. He has contributed to the magazine “L’art vivant” and now...

View Profile and Articles

More Contemporary art articles

MORE ARTICLES FOR YOU

#Bordeaux and its region is acquiring a new cultural tool, the Méca, in which the Frac Nouvelle-Aquitaine is settling in cohabitation with two major regional actors in artistic creation. A magical setting to…
#NICE Far from confining himself to his ivory tower, Ben has always wanted to bring together all the creative energies, actions and performances in relation to the public and other artists. At 83,…
#LASTDAYS Thomas Houseago creates monumental pieces that transmit both power and vulnerability. They start from matter, from the frank and voluntary gesture, incarnate gesture, gesture that expresses the desire to give shape to…