Lyon Biennale: Thinking in shapes and colours

Alexej von Jawlensky Tête de femme "Méduse" ou "Ombre et Lumière, 1923 MBA Lyon Image © Lyon MBA

Fernand Léger, La Botte de navets, 1951 MBA Lyon Image © Lyon MBA.

Steven Parrino, Turning Blue, 1988 MAC Lyon© Steven Parrino. Photo © Blaise Adilon

Robert Delaunay, Rythme, 1934. MBA de Lyon Image © Lyon MBA Photo Martial Couderette

Lucio Fontana, Ambiente spaziale, 1967. MAC-Lyon © Fondation Lucio Fontana, Milano / by SIAE ©

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Alexej von Jawlensky Tête de femme "Méduse" ou "Ombre et Lumière, 1923 MBA Lyon Image © Lyon MBA
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Fernand Léger, La Botte de navets, 1951 MBA Lyon Image © Lyon MBA.
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Steven Parrino, Turning Blue, 1988 MAC Lyon© Steven Parrino. Photo © Blaise Adilon
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Robert Delaunay, Rythme, 1934. MBA de Lyon Image © Lyon MBA Photo Martial Couderette
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Lucio Fontana, Ambiente spaziale, 1967. MAC-Lyon © Fondation Lucio Fontana, Milano / by SIAE ©

#LYON This aphorism that Georges Braque is attributed to, “Le peintre pense en formes et en couleurs” is the source of a rich exhibition at the Musée des Beaux Arts de Lyon for the 15th edition of the Biennale. The interaction of form and colour, its technical impact as well as its psychological effects, have woven a new history of painting throughout the 20th century. This adventure is recounted here not according to a chronological approach but by the juxtaposition of certain researches that touched on the relationship to matter, sculpture, drawing and that explore the chromatic variations that resulted from it.

Shapes and colours gradually take over their autonomy but emancipate themselves in concert as in “La botte de navets” by Fernant Léger where the color no longer follows the contours but is arranged in large flat areas that illuminate the drawing without interfering in its construction Steven Parrino in 1988, by moving the canvas from its frame, reveals a monochrome with its folds, its shadows which are now part of the sole objectivity of the material. This one is magnified elsewhere by Eugène Leroy when the color germinates there for the silent blossoming of the figure. On the contrary, Olivier Debré summons the space that gradually tends towards a more transparent tone, giving free rein to the sensations and horizon of monochromy. A very large format ofOlivier Mosset of 1987 where the canvas is stripped of all depth, vibrates with the sole intensity of its colored field. The space then merges into the light and responds as a counterpoint to the ultra-black of Reliefs.

Nearly fifty artists lend themselves to this exploration which, even today, elsewhere, on other supports and by other ways, does not stop dragging us into this wonderful adventure of form and colour. In addition to the Biennale d’ Art Contemporain and the gigantic scale of its installations, painting here serenely lives its quest for beauty

 

Until January 5, 2020

“Think in shapes and colours”

Museum of Fine ArtsLyon, France.

Michel Gathier

With a literary background, Michel Gathier developed a passion for art very early, particularly during long stays abroad. He has contributed to the magazine “L’art vivant” and now...

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