Lost or Desirable Future Paradise at the Bullukian Foundation

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#LYON Parodying the sentence of the precursor of the cinematographer, Louis Lumière, “Cinema is an invention without a future”, the Italian artist Andrea Mastrovito offers us a re-reading of the world through an assumed shift that forces us to observe it according to mediums and norms that are contrary to their original function. Thus, on a 110 m2 floor, the artist has a set made of marquetry for a patchwork of representations of mythical shots of the cinema. But these reflect what our world is like – images, ruins, disarticulated space and insurrectional time. But the artist, at ease in all registers, has fun balancing this dark work with a debauchery of colours and shapes for a seemingly naive look at the explosion of plant and animal life But this nature seized to the extreme to the point of transforming into myth is a way for Mastrovito to alert us to the threats facing her. This fantasized, ideal nature that he shows us is only the result of an accumulation of book cut-outs and therefore of a transformation of nature or plastic documents. Would the post-humanist horizon be post-natural, would it remain only the idealized illustration of a fallen universe? And would the splendour of a landscape be nothing more than the a priori composition of a programmed extinction? In this work there is the sad echo of a lost paradise but also the saving breath of another journey, of a world to be redone. And that’s probably what’s at stake in this Lyon Biennale. In the Bullukian Foundation, Mastrovito’s work is presented in parallel with that of Jérémy Godéin the garden, so different in form, but which resonates with her like a coda because she is so involved in the same commitment but through science and industry. Fany Robin’s curatorial work results in a coherent exhibition that opens up for reflection.

For the rest of the Biennale, we can then wonder about this collective curatorial work from the same Palais Tokyo seraglio which, despite sometimes striking works, has chosen works based on a soft consensus. Often they seem to parasitize each other, to play the gigantic to overcome an uncertain meaning so that the best is next to the worst of the recyclable and the déjà vu. This Biennale, if it remains exciting, gives above all the desire to follow certain artists who, in a more modest setting, would spread a sensitive and personal reflection on the challenges of today’s world.

 

 

Until January 5, 2020

Jeremy Gobé “Anthopocene”

Andrea Mastrovito “The world is an invention without a future”

Bullukian Foundation, LYON

Michel Gathier

With a literary background, Michel Gathier developed a passion for art very early, particularly during long stays abroad. He has contributed to the magazine “L’art vivant” and now...

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